Hybrid Vehicles Are Hot For the Planet and Your Wallet!

First point is everyone should think about hybrid vehicle because of the preservation of the atmosphere. A hybrid vehicle is a vehicle that uses two or more distinct power sources to move the vehicle. But let’s face it: the sticker price of a hybrid vehicle is significantly higher than its gasoline-powered counterpart.

Definition: a hybrid vehicle is a vehicle that uses an on-board rechargeable energy storage system (RESS) and a fuel based power source for vehicle propulsion. Now that you know what a special vehicle is, you may wonder if owning one is right for you. Get your check book out and stop wasting your money on a gas guzzler. A method for controlling an effective vehicle is described in German patent application no? A negative value indicates that a hybrid is less expensive to own, while a positive value in this cell indicates the premium paid to own a hybrid car.

Learn if owning one of these is right for your lifestyle. According to a first aspect of the present invention an apparatus for use within the vehicle is provided. Bless your heart for thinking of the next generation. A hybrid vehicle is any kind of vehicle that uses two or more propulsion systems. An ice in this vehicle is required to produce electricity or hydraulic pressure depending on the drive train technology (traction motors) deployed. The mileage you can receive from this vehicle is going to range from 26 miles per gallon to about 48 miles per gallon. Resale value: finally, one of the last things that you should take a look at when evaluating a hybrid is the resale value.

The idea of using the kinetic energy from a flywheel in this vehicle is brilliant. The control method according to the invention for the vehicle is based on a strategy that consists of transmitting power, via the road on which the vehicle is traveling, from the etu to the electric machine associated with the rear electric drivetrain in order to recharge the battery. This vehicle is by definition a form of transportation using a mix of energy sources and combining different fuel technologies. A this vehicle is essentially the same as any other vehicle except for the extra high-voltage hybrid hardware. A federal tax deduction of $2,000 for the purchase of a hybrid vehicle is available in many cases, and some states may provide additional incentives or tax credits to encourage the purchase of hybrid vehicles.

Are Hybrid Vehicles the Answer to Rising Energy Prices?

There are a number of hybrid cars on the market today. Some of the more popular models are the Honda Civic Hybrid, Honda Accord Hybrid, Toyota Prius, Toyota Camry Hybrid, and the Ford Escape Hybrid. As a result of those who are environmentally minded, many more hybrid vehicles are coming to market, in addition to cars. Now hybrid trucks and hybrid SUVs are also becoming very popular.

There are some viable alternatives to the gasoline or diesel engine, available to the average consumer, when looking for a new vehicle. The hybrid car has become much more popular recently. A hybrid car is one that operates on more than one fuel system. The most common hybrid vehicle combines fossil fuel with electric energy. These cars primarily run on gasoline, but are assisted by electric current that is supplied by a rechargeable nickel-metal hydride (NiMH), battery pack. With this combination of fuel systems, there are two positive outcomes; fuel efficiency is improved, and engine exhaust emissions are cut down.

If you are buying a used car, be a little leery of hybrids. The battery packs in a hybrid car have to be replaced after 80,000 to 150,000 miles. In some states they are warrantied for 150,000 miles, or up to eight years. Depending on the age of the car, it may cost you more to replace this battery pack than the car is worth.

When comparing the price of a hybrid vehicle versus a non-hybrid, it’s wise to get quotes on like models for your comparison. What I mean is this. If you are looking at a Civic Hybrid, compare its price to the regular Civic. You can then calculate the difference in price. The difference is what you are paying extra for the hybrid. By doing this, it will help you see if you can actually save money in the long run by spending a little more up front.

How much better is the gas mileage with a hybrid car? It all depends on the type of driving you do. Overall, hybrid cars save at least 15% on the amount of fuel used. In some driving environments, you may not save anything. For example, trying to accelerate while going up hills will decrease your efficiency, as it can with any vehicle.

Here are some driving styles that can affect how a hybrid car works: When at a full stop, the gas engine usually shuts off. This eliminates idling, and reduces emissions. However, in traffic with a lot of stop and go situations, this can also save a fair amount of fuel. If you are in stop and go traffic all day, the gas engine may have to switch on to keep the battery fully charged.

When accelerating from a stop, if you do it like your grandmother, the electric motor usually propels the hybrid car through the current supplied by the battery pack. This is where you can save the most with a hybrid. Unfortunately, that’s not how I drive most of the time.

When you use heavy acceleration, this draws power from both the electric motor and the gas motor. If you do a lot of this style of driving, you probably won’t save much, if anything, with the hybrid car.

During highway driving, the car is typically powered by the gas engine alone. Whenever the gas engine is running, it is charging the battery pack, but you don’t receive any added fuel efficiency because of the hybrid design. If most of your driving is on the highway, you may not save much gas at all with the hybrid. The only advantage of a hybrid car in this instance is a slight improvement in gas mileage, due primarily to the smaller engine. Several of the hybrids also are equipped with a variable transmission. This will allow the engine to operate more efficiently, by using an optimal RPM at all times.

When you break gently, coast, or decelerate, the hybrid electric motor works in reverse. It is now converting kinetic energy into electric energy as a generator. The process used to charge the battery is known as regenerative braking. This process charges the battery pack, which eliminates any need to ever plug the car in for charging. By the way, a hybrid car can’t be plugged in to charge the battery. That isn’t part of its design.

When you back up in a hybrid car, the electric motor does all the work, as the gasoline engine is disengaged. Since most people don’t back up that much, the savings of fuel in this mode is very minimal.

If a hybrid car is driven properly, one can see a fuel savings of at least 15% or more. In that case, the hybrid vehicle may be the answer to rising energy prices.

Does Your Hybrid Vehicle Qualify for Full Tax Credits?

Not all 2007 tax credits for hybrid vehicles are the same, even if the taxpayer bought the same car. How is that possible?

The 2005 Energy Act providing tax credits for new hybrid vehicle owners include qualifications that the owners must meet. Some of the qualifications such as the following are clear cut.

1. The vehicle must be bought on or before 12/31/10 and driven or used after 12/31/05.

2. The tax credit may be claimed only by the original owner of the new hybrid. A preowned or used hybrid vehicle does not qualify for the credit.

3. In order to take advantage of their credit, some first time owners of hybrid vehicles might have to recapture their tax credit if they resell their hybrid car or truck.

4, The vehicle must be driven mainly in the United States.

5. If a hybrid vehicle is leased, the leasing company has the right to claim the tax credit, as the credit is only available to the original purchaser of the hybrid vehicle.

So far the hybrid owner only needs to take basic precautions. But the Energy Act goes farther and places other qualifications to consider such as the date of purchase and number of hybrids sold per car manufacturer.

The number of hybrids is limited by 60,000 hybrids per car manufacturers that may be claimed for taxes. Two hybrids that have met the 60,000 mark in June 2006 are Toyota and Lexus hybrids. Buyers who purchased their Toyota hybrid or Lexus hybrid before October 1 will have 100 percent of their tax credit. While buyers who purchased their hybrids on or after October 1 will have a tax credit that is reduced by 50 percent.

That means that some buyers of a new Prius or Lexus hybrid vehicle will qualify for the full $3,150 tax credit. While other buyers of the same vehicle will receive only a $1,575 tax credit. Therefore, the amount that the taxpayer may claim is not only based on the amount the vehicles qualifies for but also is based on the date the hybrid was purchased.

It should be noted that the tax credit will not last forever, but will be phased out by 2010. This is hurried along by reducing the amount of tax claims until it is gone.

For example, after 60,000 vehicles are sold, the taxpayer may claim the full amount of credit for that first quarter. For the second and third quarter after 60,000 vehicles are sold, the taxpayer may claim half or 50 percent of the tax credit. During the fourth and fifth quarter, the taxpayer may claim 25 percent of tax claim. After the fifth quarter the 60,000 vehicles are sold, no tax credit may be claimed.

A further limitation in claiming a tax credit is based on the type of vehicle purchased. This involves the amount of reduced emissions and fuels saved by the said vehicle. Only the type of vehicle is considered. Price is not a factor. You would guess that the more expensive hybrids would bring a higher tax credit. But, this is not always the case. For example, a $40,000 Lexus RX 400h hybrid commands a maximum of only a $2,200 tax credit.

Another consideration in limiting tax credits is the Alternative Minimum Tax (ATM), which may disqualify some other taxpayers.

Other hybrid manufacturers such Honda, Ford, GM have not meet the 60,000 limit and still qualify for the full amount. You do not have the same considerations, at the present time, that others such as Toyota hybrid owners must contend with.